About Louisa
Louisa is a journalist and graphic designer based in London, where she was born and raised. With both parents of Hong Kong origin and half a dozen visits later, Louisa has grown to love the once British colony of 150 years. Travel guides will tell you Hong Kong is a place of shopping/eating, and whilst sampling new wave Asian desserts is still high on the agenda, Louisa prefers to spend her time there documenting the cultural differences between the England and China.
http://www.lustandfoundmag.com
Current city: Hong Kong
Louisa is a journalist and graphic designer based in London, where she was born and raised. With both parents of Hong Kong origin and half a dozen visits later, Louisa has grown to love the once British colony of 150 years. Travel guides will tell you Hong Kong is a place of shopping/eating, and whilst sampling new wave Asian desserts is still high on the agenda, Louisa prefers to spend her time there documenting the cultural differences between the England and China.
 
Ok so I know this is the third food post but typically the reason for going on holiday is eat well. This is probably my favourite meal of all time, hot pot, or what I like to call, "Hotch Potch" is huge cauldron of soup stock in the middle of the table, where you order endless plates of raw meats, seafood, vegetable and noodles to cook yourself, at your own pace. My stomach welcomes this warming meal most during London's colder months, but the sheer choice and freshness of ingredients on offer in Tao Heung means there's always room for Hotch Potch even in Hong Kong's warm humid climate.
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A 'cha chan teng' is Hong Kong's answer to the UK greasy spoon cafe, there are regional equivalents across China but what makes a cha chan teng unique is it's product. Toasted white bread rolls with condensed milk, deep fried chicken wings, pork chop sandwich…the list goes on. There aren't many of these types of establishments left in Hong Kong, but there seems to be a revival in this old-skool way of chilling out over a cup of 'silk stocking tea' (my favourite). I stumbled across the newly opened Lan Fong Yuen in Tsim Sha Tsui's Woodhouse mall, though it also has some small locations dating back to the 1950s.
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One of the many reasons for venturing to Yuen Long a quiet suburb, was to track down this building. It used to be a secondary school, attended by my dad, but since the school closed in the 80s, it became abandoned, and is now used as a film location for horror flicks (theres a film school across the road). He'd not seen this building since he teenage education, so the fact that I went there meant a lot to him. Most buildings of this ilk in Hong Kong have been knocked down and turned into modern flats, so when my Dad saw this photo, he was glad that it's still in tact, despite it's condition.
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Hong Kong is a city of convenience, as you're never more than 100 metres away from a newspaper stand (sort of like a mobile newsagent). In some of the oldest streets of Central/Wan Chai, you'll find these types of metal kiosks each specialising in one service; key cutting, shoe shine, even Chinese pharmaceuticals. However this bright blue Stamp Kiosk was something I'd never seen before, a middle aged lady waiting to carve traditional chinese ceramic stamps as well as western rubber ones. Convenient or just random?
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Located on the east coast of Kowloon, Sai Kung's restaurants offer the largest variety of seafood than any establishment in town. Chuen Kee is one of the more renowned places, with 2 brands on the pier. All the sea creatures are usually in water tanks, where diners can to pick their meal, but also acts as a attraction for passers-by. This giant squid caught my eye, too bad I didn't get to eat it.
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With a population of over 7 million, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated cities, so it's no wonder it's filled to the brim with high rise flats. Architecturally, these are not the most sophisticated, but I chose this photo for the washed out pastel colours. I'm also drawn to the rows and rows of air conditioning units on the exteriors of the building.
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I almost didn't include this purely for ubiquitous nature of the photo, just see the image results when googling Hong Kong and you'll know what I mean. However I can't deny the beauty of this view from one of many tourist destinations, The Peak, which visitors will ride a 1930s wooden tram for 15 minutes just to take this photo. I also like it for it's architectural aesthetic. I think it's only when you view Hong Kong's cityscape like this, that you realise the density of the buildings, something you might not realise at ground level.
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Posted by Louisa Lau
Shopping may not be the main agenda of coming to Hong Kong, so when I see a boutique with an unusual selection of independent designers (pretty rare by Hong Kong retail standards), it's probably something to write home about. Located in the fashion hub that is Causeway Bay, Liger is the fashion child of style icon Hilary Tsui and stylist Dorothy Hui. Stocking an edited curation of established avant garde labels like Rue de Mail, Karen Walker and Richard Nicoll to emerging talent like Fannie Schiavoni, Swash and Bitching and Junkfood. It's a mix of edgy directional with classic wearable pieces thats makes Liger a Hong-Kong-go-to-destination, so much so that it is opening a 2nd stand alone store at the aforementioned Woodhouse mall.
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More People in Hong Kong 2

Stephenie Kay Lc was born in 1986. She is an artist and photographer based in Hong Kong. Stephenie had her first Polaroid Exhibition "Portrait Photography" at Mint in Hong Kong, on March 2013.
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