About Filippos
Filippos Fragkogiannis is a freelance graphic designer and art director, based in Athens. He holds an MA in Visual Communication, and a BA in Graphic Design from Vakalo College and the University of Derby. Having collaborated with acclaimed graphic and type designers, on April 16th 2019 he established his own practice. His research-based approach is rooted in semiotics, symbolism and the mechanics of visual language. His projects center around visual identities, posters, and print collateral, and he regularly enhances type foundries with bold imagery. In 2018, he founded Certain Magazine, an independent curatorial platform that chronicles contemporary graphic design and celebrates handpicked design projects from around the world.
https://filipposfragkogiannis.com
Current city: Athens
Other cities: KallitheaCorinth
Filippos Fragkogiannis is a freelance graphic designer and art director, based in Athens. He holds an MA in Visual Communication, and a BA in Graphic Design from Vakalo College and the University of Derby. Having collaborated with acclaimed graphic and type designers, on April 16th 2019 he established his own practice. His research-based approach is rooted in semiotics, symbolism and the mechanics of visual language. His projects center around visual identities, posters, and print collateral, and he regularly enhances type foundries with bold imagery. In 2018, he founded Certain Magazine, an independent curatorial platform that chronicles contemporary graphic design and celebrates handpicked design projects from around the world.
 
The Academy of Athens is one of the most prominent institutions of higher education and research in Greece. It is located in Athens, the capital city of Greece, and was founded in 1926 with the aim of promoting scientific and academic excellence in the country. The Academy of Athens is modeled after the famous Academy of Plato and is housed in a neoclassical building that was designed by the Danish architect Theophil Hansen. The building is located in the center of Athens, near Syntagma Square, and is considered one of the most important architectural landmarks in the city. The Academy is comprised of several research centers, each dedicated to a specific field of study, including humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, and life sciences. The Academy's mission is to promote research, education, and public service in these fields, and to advance the knowledge and understanding of Greece's cultural heritage and scientific contributions to the world. The Academy also plays an important role in shaping public policy and decision-making in Greece, and its members are often called upon to provide expert advice and counsel to government officials and other stakeholders. The Academy of Athens is widely recognized as a leading institution of higher learning and research in Greece, and its members have made significant contributions to a wide range of fields, including philosophy, literature, history, mathematics, physics, biology, and medicine.
Read More
The National Archaeological Museum of Athens is the largest archaeological museum in Greece and one of the most important museums in the world. It was founded in 1829 and has been housed in its current neoclassical building since 1889. The museum houses a vast collection of ancient Greek art and artifacts that span over 5,000 years of Greek history, from the prehistoric period to the Roman era. The collection includes sculptures, pottery, jewelry, metalwork, and other objects that provide insight into the daily life, religious practices, and artistic achievements of ancient Greece. One of the most impressive exhibits in the museum is the Mycenaean collection, which includes artifacts from the ancient city of Mycenae, including the famous golden mask of Agamemnon. The museum also has a large collection of sculptures from the classical period, including the bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon, and the Artemision Bronze. The National Archaeological Museum of Athens has undergone several renovations and expansions over the years to accommodate its growing collection and improve the visitor experience. Today, the museum attracts thousands of visitors each year who come to marvel at the ancient treasures that are on display and learn about the rich cultural heritage of Greece.
Read More
The Acropolis of Athens is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the most famous landmarks in Greece. It is a rocky hilltop that overlooks the city of Athens and contains several ancient architectural wonders, including the Parthenon, the Propylaea, the Erechtheion, and the Temple of Athena Nike. The Acropolis of Athens has been inhabited since prehistoric times and has been used as a site for religious worship and civic ceremonies for thousands of years. It reached the height of its glory during the 5th century BCE, when the Athenians built many of the structures that still stand today. These structures were built using the finest materials and decorated with intricate sculptures and reliefs that depicted the gods, heroes, and events of ancient Greek mythology. The Parthenon, the most famous of the Acropolis' structures, was built between 447 and 438 BCE as a temple to the goddess Athena. It is considered one of the greatest achievements of ancient Greek architecture, with its perfectly proportioned columns, elaborate sculptures, and stunning friezes. Today, the Acropolis of Athens is a major tourist destination and a symbol of the cultural and historical richness of Greece. Visitors can explore the ruins of the ancient structures, admire the stunning views of the city from the hilltop, and learn about the fascinating history of this iconic site.
Read More
The Theatre of Dionysus is an ancient theater located on the southern slope of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. It is named after Dionysus, the Greek god of wine, fertility, and theater, and it was the site of the ancient Athenian drama festivals. The Theatre of Dionysus was built in the 6th century BC, and it underwent several renovations and expansions over the centuries. At its peak, it could seat up to 17,000 spectators, and it was considered one of the most important theaters in the ancient world. The theater was the birthplace of Greek drama, and it hosted many famous plays by the great playwrights of the time, including Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. It was also the site of the first dramatic competitions, which were held in honor of Dionysus and involved the performance of three tragedies and one satyr play. Today, the Theatre of Dionysus is a popular tourist attraction in Athens. Although much of the original structure has been lost to time, visitors can still see the remains of the stage, the orchestra pit, and some of the seating areas. The theater is also used for performances and events during the Athens Festival, which takes place every summer.
Read More
The Temple of Hephaestus, also known as the Hephaisteion, is an ancient Greek temple located on the northwest side of the Ancient Agora of Athens. It was built in the 5th century BCE and is considered one of the best-preserved ancient Greek temples in the world. The temple was dedicated to the Greek god Hephaestus, who was the god of metalworking, blacksmiths, and craftsmen. The temple was also sometimes associated with Athena Ergane, the goddess of crafts. The Temple of Hephaestus is a Doric-style temple made of marble and limestone. It features 34 columns and a rectangular floor plan with a central cella (sanctuary) surrounded by a peristyle (a colonnade that surrounds the temple). The friezes on the temple depict scenes from Greek mythology, including the labors of Hercules and the battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs. Despite being built over 2,400 years ago, the Temple of Hephaestus remains in excellent condition, thanks in part to its use as a Christian church in the Byzantine era. Today, it is a popular tourist attraction and an important example of ancient Greek architecture and engineering.
Read More
The Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens, also known as the Metropolis, is the main cathedral of the Greek Orthodox Church in Athens, Greece. It is located in the heart of the city, near Syntagma Square and the Greek Parliament. The cathedral was originally built in the 19th century, on the site of an older church that had been destroyed during the Greek War of Independence. It was designed in a neoclassical style by the German architect Friedrich von Gärtner, and features a large central dome and two smaller domes on either side. The interior of the cathedral is richly decorated with Byzantine-style frescoes and mosaics, as well as ornate iconography and intricate wood carvings. It has a capacity of over 5,000 people, making it one of the largest churches in Athens. The Metropolis is an important religious and cultural institution in Greece, and is the seat of the Archbishop of Athens and All Greece. It is also a popular destination for tourists, who come to admire its impressive architecture and beautiful interior decorations. In addition to its religious functions, the cathedral is also used for a variety of cultural events and concerts throughout the year, and is an important venue for the city's cultural life.
Read More
The Museum of Cycladic Art is a museum in Athens, Greece, dedicated to the art and culture of the Cycladic Islands in the Aegean Sea. It is located in the Kolonaki neighborhood of Athens, and is one of the city's most popular cultural attractions. The museum was founded in 1986 by the Greek art collector Nicholas Goulandris and his wife Dolly, who had amassed a large collection of ancient Cycladic artifacts. Today, the museum's collection includes over 3,000 objects, spanning from the Neolithic period to the early Byzantine era. The museum's exhibits are organized thematically and chronologically, with displays covering the art, religion, and daily life of the Cycladic Islands. The collection includes a large number of marble figurines and vessels, as well as jewelry, weapons, and other artifacts. Notable pieces include the Harp Player figurine and the Spedos type figurines, which are considered some of the finest examples of Cycladic art. In addition to its exhibits, the Museum of Cycladic Art also hosts a variety of cultural events, including lectures, workshops, and temporary exhibitions featuring contemporary art and other topics. There is also a gift shop and a café on site. Overall, the Museum of Cycladic Art is an important institution for the study and appreciation of ancient Cycladic culture and art, and is a must-visit destination for anyone interested in the history and culture of Greece.
Read More
The Areopagus Hill, also known as the Hill of Ares, is a prominent rock outcropping located northwest of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. In ancient times, the hill was the site of the Areopagus, a council of elders who were responsible for hearing cases of homicide and other serious crimes. The name "Areopagus" means "Hill of Ares," and it was said to be the site where Ares, the god of war, was tried for the murder of Poseidon's son. According to mythology, Ares was acquitted, and the hill became a place of judgment for the people of Athens. Today, the Areopagus Hill is a popular destination for tourists and locals alike, who come to enjoy its stunning views of the city and the surrounding landscape. Visitors can climb the rocky steps to the top of the hill, where they can see the remains of the ancient court and enjoy panoramic views of Athens. The Areopagus Hill is also associated with several important historical and cultural events. For example, according to the Bible, the apostle Paul preached on the hill during his visit to Athens in the 1st century AD. In addition, the hill has been the site of numerous political demonstrations and protests throughout modern Greek history.
Read More
The Panathenaic Stadium, also known as the Kallimarmaro Stadium, is an ancient stadium located in Athens, Greece. The stadium was originally built in the 4th century BC for the Panathenaic Games, a major athletic and cultural festival held in Athens every four years. The stadium was renovated in the 2nd century AD, and later underwent extensive reconstruction in the 19th century, based on its ancient design. It was used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, and has since been the venue for the marathon finish line in all subsequent Olympic Games held in Athens. The Panathenaic Stadium is made entirely of marble and has a capacity of approximately 50,000 spectators. The track is 204.07 meters in length and 33.34 meters in width, making it larger than a standard modern Olympic track. Today, the stadium is open to visitors, who can take a tour of the site and learn about its history and significance. The stadium also hosts various cultural and sporting events throughout the year, and is considered one of the most important landmarks in Athens.
Read More
The Acropolis Museum is an archaeological museum located in Athens, Greece, near the Acropolis hill. It was built to house and display artifacts from the Acropolis of Athens, one of the most important archaeological sites in Greece. The museum opened to the public in 2009 and is considered one of the most important and impressive museums in Greece. It is built over an archaeological site and features exhibits from the Archaic and Classical periods of ancient Greece, including sculptures, pottery, and other artifacts. One of the main attractions of the Acropolis Museum is the Parthenon Gallery, which displays many of the surviving sculptures and friezes from the Parthenon, including several of the famous Elgin Marbles that were taken to Britain in the 19th century. The museum also features exhibits from other important buildings on the Acropolis, such as the Erechtheion and the Temple of Athena Nike. The museum is designed to be a modern and interactive space, with multimedia exhibits and displays that help visitors understand the history and significance of the artifacts on display. It also features a rooftop terrace with panoramic views of the Acropolis and the city of Athens.
Read More
Pedion tou Areos is a large public park located in the center of Athens, Greece. It is situated just north of the National Archaeological Museum of Athens and covers an area of approximately 27 hectares. The park has a long and interesting history. It was originally used as an army parade ground during the Ottoman occupation of Greece, and later served as a military training ground for the Greek army. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, it was also used as a venue for various cultural events, including concerts, fairs, and exhibitions. Today, Pedion tou Areos is a popular destination for locals and tourists alike. It features several walking and jogging paths. The park also contains several large open spaces and a small lake, making it an ideal spot for picnics and other outdoor activities. Overall, Pedion tou Areos is a valuable green space in the heart of Athens, providing a peaceful and relaxing escape from the busy city streets.
Read More
The Arch of Hadrian, also known as Hadrian's Gate, is a monumental gateway located in the historic center of Athens, Greece. It was built in the 2nd century AD by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, who was a great admirer of Greek culture. The Arch of Hadrian served both a practical and symbolic purpose. It marked the boundary between the ancient city of Athens and the new Roman city, and also served as a grand entrance to the city for visitors arriving from the east. At the same time, it celebrated Hadrian's achievements and his appreciation for Greek culture, and served as a powerful symbol of the close relationship between Rome and Athens. Today, the Arch of Hadrian is a popular tourist attraction in Athens, and is widely recognized as one of the city's most impressive ancient monuments. It is located near several other notable landmarks, including the Temple of Olympian Zeus and the Acropolis.
Read More
The Kerameikos Archaeological Museum is a museum located in Athens, Greece, that houses archaeological artifacts from the ancient Athenian cemetery of Kerameikos. The cemetery was in use from the 8th century BCE until Roman times and was the final resting place for many important figures of ancient Athens. The museum contains a collection of funerary monuments, statues, reliefs, and other artifacts discovered during excavations of the Kerameikos cemetery. One of the most notable exhibits is the Stele of Hegeso, a 4th-century BCE marble relief that depicts a young woman examining her jewelry. The museum also contains a large collection of grave stelae, which were used to mark graves and often contained depictions of the deceased and their families. In addition to the permanent exhibits, the museum also hosts temporary exhibitions that showcase artifacts from other archaeological sites in Greece. The museum is located near the ancient Agora and the Acropolis, making it a popular destination for tourists interested in ancient Greek history and culture. Overall, the Kerameikos Archaeological Museum is an important cultural institution that preserves and displays artifacts from the ancient Athenian cemetery of Kerameikos, providing insight into the funerary customs and beliefs of the ancient Greeks.
Read More
The Stoa of Attalos is an ancient building located in the Agora of Athens, Greece. It was originally built by King Attalos II of Pergamon in the 2nd century BC as a gift to the city of Athens, and was used as a covered marketplace and meeting place. The Stoa of Attalos was a two-story building with a colonnade of 21 Doric columns on the ground floor and 21 Ionic columns on the upper floor. The building was about 115 meters long and 20 meters wide, and it had a central hall and several smaller rooms. During the Roman period, the Stoa of Attalos was damaged by fire and earthquakes, and it fell into disrepair. In the 1950s, the building was reconstructed by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, using ancient building materials and techniques. Today, the Stoa of Attalos houses the Museum of the Ancient Agora, which contains exhibits on the history of the Agora and ancient Athens. The museum's collection includes pottery, coins, sculpture, and other artifacts from the ancient Greek and Roman periods.
Read More
The Odeon of Herodes Atticus is an ancient amphitheater located on the southwestern slope of the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. It was built in 161 AD by the wealthy Roman Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, and it was used for music concerts, theatrical performances, and other cultural events. The Odeon of Herodes Atticus is a beautiful and well-preserved example of Roman-era architecture. It has a semi-circular shape with a diameter of 80 meters, and it could seat up to 5,000 spectators. The theater was built using white Pentelic marble, and it was covered by a wooden roof that has since been lost to time. In ancient times, the Odeon of Herodes Atticus was one of the most prestigious venues for musical and theatrical performances in Athens. It hosted many famous performers, including the Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis, the Spanish tenor Placido Domingo, and the American singer Frank Sinatra. Today, the Odeon of Herodes Atticus is still used as a venue for cultural events, especially during the summer months when the Athens Festival takes place. The theater's impressive acoustics and beautiful setting make it a popular destination for music and theater lovers from all over the world.
Read More
The First Cemetery of Athens, also known as the Cemetery of the Athenians, is one of the oldest and most historic cemeteries in Athens, Greece. It was established in 1837 and was the first organized cemetery of the modern Greek state. It is located in the central Athens neighborhood of Mets, near the Temple of Olympian Zeus and the Panathenaic Stadium. The cemetery is the final resting place for many notable Greeks, including politicians, artists, writers, and scientists. Among the famous individuals buried there are the poet Kostis Palamas, the composer Mikis Theodorakis, the politician Eleftherios Venizelos, and the archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann. The First Cemetery of Athens is not only a place of mourning but also a cultural site with numerous sculptures, mausoleums, and ornate tombs. The cemetery is designed like a small park, with winding paths and shady trees that make it a peaceful and contemplative place to visit. It is also a popular tourist destination, with guided tours available to visitors who want to explore the cemetery's rich history. In recent years, the cemetery has undergone renovations to improve the facilities and preserve its historic monuments. Today, the First Cemetery of Athens remains an important cultural institution that provides a glimpse into Greece's past and honors the memory of its most illustrious citizens.
Read More
Zappeion Hall, also known as the Zappeion Megaron, is a neoclassical building located in the heart of Athens, Greece. It was built in the late 19th century and is named after the Zappas brothers, who were wealthy Greek philanthropists. The Zappeion Hall was designed by Danish architect Theophil Hansen and was originally built to host events for the revival of the Olympic Games in Athens in 1896. It was the first building in Greece to be constructed specifically for this purpose. The building features a large central hall, surrounded by several smaller rooms and courtyards. It has a distinctive neoclassical design, with columns and ornate detailing inspired by ancient Greek architecture. Over the years, the Zappeion Hall has been used for a wide range of events, including exhibitions, conferences, and cultural events. It has also been used as a filming location for several movies and television shows. Today, the Zappeion Hall is a popular tourist attraction and an important cultural landmark in Athens. Visitors can explore the building and its grounds, attend events and exhibitions, or simply enjoy the beautiful neoclassical architecture and gardens.
Read More
The Monument to the Unknown Soldier is a prominent landmark located in front of the Hellenic Parliament building in Athens, Greece. It is a war memorial dedicated to the memory of Greek soldiers who lost their lives fighting for their country during various conflicts throughout history. The monument consists of a large stone structure with a central pedestal that supports a statue of a dying soldier. The soldier is depicted wearing a helmet and carrying a shield and a sword, and is lying on his back with his arms spread out, as if embracing his country. The statue is made of Pentelic marble and stands over 3 meters tall. The monument is guarded around the clock by two Evzones, the elite soldiers of the Greek Presidential Guard, who are dressed in their traditional uniform of white kilt, red cap, and black shoes with pompons. Every year on March 25th, Greece's Independence Day, a grand military parade takes place in front of the monument, and wreaths are laid in honor of the Unknown Soldier. The Monument to the Unknown Soldier is not only a symbol of remembrance for fallen Greek soldiers but also a testament to the country's patriotism and unwavering commitment to defend its sovereignty and independence.
Read More
The Numismatic Museum of Athens, also known as Iliou Melathron, is a museum dedicated to the history of currency and coinage in Greece and the broader Mediterranean region. It is located in the Ilisia neighborhood of Athens, Greece, and is housed in a 19th-century mansion that was originally built for the renowned archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann. The museum's collection includes over 600,000 coins, as well as medals, decorations, and paper currency, spanning from ancient Greece to modern times. It is one of the largest and most important collections of coins in the world, and is known for its unique and rare specimens, such as the famous Syracusan dekadrachm from the 5th century BC. The museum's exhibits are organized thematically and chronologically, with displays covering the development of coinage in Greece, the Roman Empire, Byzantium, and beyond. There are also exhibits that explore the use of coins in daily life, as well as their role in shaping political, economic, and cultural history. In addition to its exhibits, the Numismatic Museum of Athens also offers educational programs, including guided tours, workshops, and lectures, as well as research facilities for scholars and researchers. Overall, it is an important institution for the study and appreciation of numismatics, and a must-visit destination for anyone interested in the history of currency and coinage.
Read More
Plaka is a historic neighborhood located in the heart of Athens, Greece. It is known for its picturesque narrow streets, traditional Greek architecture, and scenic views of the Acropolis. Plaka is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Athens, and it is located at the foot of the Acropolis hill. The area is characterized by its neoclassical buildings, Byzantine churches, and Ottoman-era mansions. In Plaka, visitors can find a variety of restaurants, cafes, bars, and shops selling souvenirs and traditional Greek products. The neighborhood is also home to several museums, including the Museum of Greek Folk Musical Instruments, the Museum of Popular Music Instruments, and the Museum of Greek Children's Art. One of the main attractions in Plaka is the Anafiotika neighborhood, a tiny enclave of whitewashed houses and narrow alleys that resemble the villages of the Cyclades islands. Another popular site in Plaka is the Roman Agora, an ancient marketplace that dates back to the 1st century BC. Plaka is a charming and vibrant neighborhood that offers visitors a glimpse into the history and culture of Athens, as well as stunning views of the city's most famous landmark, the Acropolis.
Read More
The Ancient Agora of Athens was the central public space in the city of Athens during the Classical period of ancient Greece. It served as a place for citizens to gather for political, commercial, and social activities. The Agora was originally used as a marketplace, but over time it became a place for public gatherings, religious ceremonies, and political debates. It was also home to many important buildings and structures, such as the Stoa of Attalos, the Temple of Hephaestus, and the Bouleuterion (council chamber). The Agora was the birthplace of democracy in Athens, as it was the site of the popular assemblies where citizens could voice their opinions and vote on important issues. It was also where famous philosophers, such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, gave their lectures and debated with one another. Today, the Ancient Agora of Athens is a popular tourist attraction and an important archaeological site. Visitors can see the ruins of the ancient buildings and structures, and learn about the history of ancient Athens and Greek democracy.
Read More
Filopappou Hill, also known as the Hill of the Muses, is a historic hill located in the city of Athens, Greece. It is situated southwest of the Acropolis and is part of the larger Hills of Athens complex, which includes the nearby hills of Lycabettus and Ardettos. The hill is named after Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappos, a prince from the Kingdom of Commagene who lived in the 1st century AD and was a benefactor of Athens. His monument, the Philopappos Monument, is located on the summit of the hill and is a popular tourist attraction. In addition to the Philopappos Monument, Filopappou Hill is home to several other ancient ruins and landmarks, including the Socrates Prison, the Pnyx Hill, and the Hill of the Nymphs. It is also known for its beautiful walking paths and scenic views of the city, including panoramic vistas of the Acropolis, the Aegean Sea, and the surrounding hills. Today, Filopappou Hill is a popular destination for tourists and locals alike, who come to enjoy the peaceful atmosphere, explore the ancient ruins, and take in the stunning views of Athens. It is also a protected green space and an important ecological habitat for a variety of plant and animal species.
Read More
Anafiotika is a small neighborhood located on the northeastern side of the Acropolis hill in Athens, Greece. It is known for its picturesque white-washed houses, narrow alleys, and stunning views of the city. The neighborhood of Anafiotika was established in the mid-19th century by settlers from the island of Anafi, who came to Athens to work on the construction of King Otto's palace. These settlers built their homes using the traditional Cycladic architecture of their homeland, with flat roofs, whitewashed walls, and blue doors and windows. Today, Anafiotika is a popular destination for tourists and locals alike, who come to stroll through its narrow streets, admire its charming houses, and enjoy its stunning views of the city and the Acropolis. Visitors can also explore the neighborhood's small churches and chapels, which are decorated with beautiful frescoes and icons. Despite its popularity, Anafiotika remains a quiet and peaceful oasis in the heart of Athens, with a relaxed and laid-back atmosphere that contrasts with the bustling city below. It is a must-see destination for anyone interested in the history and culture of Athens, as well as for those seeking a peaceful escape from the hustle and bustle of the city.
Read More
The Temple of Olympian Zeus is an ancient temple located in the center of Athens, Greece. It is dedicated to Zeus, the king of the gods in Greek mythology, and it is one of the largest and most impressive temples of the ancient world. The construction of the Temple of Olympian Zeus began in the 6th century BC, during the reign of the Athenian tyrant Peisistratus. However, the temple was not completed until the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, more than 600 years later. The temple had 104 columns, each standing 17 meters tall, making it one of the largest temples in the ancient world. Today, only 15 of the original columns remain standing, along with some other architectural elements of the temple, including the ruins of the sanctuary, the cella, and the east and west pediments. The temple is an impressive sight, even in its partially ruined state, and it is a popular tourist attraction in Athens. The Temple of Olympian Zeus is located in a large park area known as the "Archaeological Site of Olympieion." The park is a peaceful and picturesque oasis in the heart of the city, with lush greenery and beautiful views of the temple and the surrounding landscape. Visitors can stroll through the park, take photos of the temple, and learn about its fascinating history through the on-site informational displays.
Read More
The National Theatre of Greece, also known as the Ethniki Skini, is the national theatre of Greece and one of the oldest and most prestigious theatres in the country. It is located in the center of Athens and has been in operation since 1901. The National Theatre of Greece was established with the aim of promoting and preserving Greek culture and language through theatrical performances. Over the years, it has played a significant role in the development of Greek theatre and has produced many notable productions. The theatre's building was designed by Greek architect Ernst Ziller in a neoclassical style, and it features a grand façade and a large auditorium that can seat up to 1,700 people. The theatre also has several smaller performance spaces and rehearsal rooms. In addition to producing theatrical productions, the National Theatre of Greece also offers training programs for actors, directors, and other theatre professionals. It has collaborated with many international theatre companies and has participated in numerous theatre festivals around the world. Overall, the National Theatre of Greece is an important institution in Greek culture and has played a significant role in the development of Greek theatre. It continues to be a popular destination for locals and tourists alike, offering a diverse range of productions throughout the year.
Read More
The Corinth Canal is a man-made waterway located in Greece that connects the Gulf of Corinth in the Ionian Sea with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow isthmus that separates the Peloponnese peninsula from the rest of Greece, and is approximately 6.4 kilometers long. The idea for the Corinth Canal dates back to ancient times, when various rulers and engineers proposed the construction of a canal to allow ships to avoid the long and treacherous journey around the Peloponnese peninsula. However, it was not until the late 19th century that the canal was actually built. Construction of the Corinth Canal began in 1881, and was completed in 1893. The canal is approximately 23 meters wide at the surface and 8 meters deep, and can accommodate ships up to 21 meters wide and 5.5 meters draft. It is a popular destination for tourists, who can watch ships passing through the narrow canal from the safety of the bridge or from boats that offer tours of the canal. The Corinth Canal is also an important transportation route for commercial ships, as it significantly reduces the travel time between the Ionian and Aegean seas. However, its narrow size and steep cliffs make it challenging to navigate, and it is not always accessible to larger vessels. Overall, the Corinth Canal is an impressive engineering feat and an important transportation and tourist attraction in Greece.
Read More
The Archaeological Museum of Ancient Corinth is located within the archaeological site of Ancient Corinth and is dedicated to displaying the numerous findings from the surrounding excavations. It is a small but rich museum, established in 1931 to host the findings of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and it is housed in a modern building that was renovated in 2004. The museum's collection includes exhibits that showcase the rich cultural heritage of Ancient Corinth from prehistoric times to the Roman era. It features a wide range of artifacts, including pottery, sculptures, coins, jewelry, and other objects that provide insight into the daily life, religious practices, and artistic achievements of ancient Greece. Some of the most notable exhibits in the museum include the terracotta figurines from the Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore, which depict the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, and the impressive statues of Roman emperors and members of the imperial family. The museum also houses multimedia exhibits and interactive displays that help visitors gain a deeper understanding of the artifacts and their historical context. Overall, the Museum of Ancient Corinth is an important cultural attraction that provides visitors with a glimpse into the rich history and culture of Ancient Corinth.
Read More
The Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth is an important historical site in Greece located about 78 km southwest of Athens. Corinth was one of the major cities of ancient Greece, and its ruins provide valuable insights into the ancient Greek civilization and the daily life of its people. The archaeological site of Ancient Corinth covers a large area and includes several notable ruins, such as the Temple of Apollo, the Agora (marketplace), the Peirene Fountain, and the Bema (judgment seat). The temple of Apollo was one of the most important sanctuaries in Ancient Corinth and was built in the 6th century BCE. It was dedicated to Apollo, the god of light, music, and poetry, and was a center for religious and cultural activities. The Agora was the center of commerce and civic life in Ancient Corinth and was surrounded by important buildings such as the courthouse, the prison, and the mint. The Peirene Fountain was the main source of water for the city and was a popular spot for social gatherings. The Bema, or judgment seat, was a raised platform where the city officials and judges would make their decisions. Visitors to the Archaeological Site of Ancient Corinth can explore the ruins of these and other important buildings, as well as see artifacts that have been excavated from the site. The site also provides stunning views of the surrounding countryside and the Gulf of Corinth.
Read More

More People in Athens 10

Aggelos Kourtidis is an independent Graphic Designer and Web Developer from Greece, who lives and works in Corinth. Graduate of Vakalo College (University of Derby), his practice focuses on creative direction, visual communication and business consulting.
Read More
French Type Designer — 22yo — like books & hardcore techno
Read More
American fine art and editorial photographer based in Athens, Greece
Read More
Argentina
Austria
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Colombia
Croatia
Czechia
Ecuador
Finland
Georgia
Hong Kong
Iceland
Indonesia
Ireland
Israel
Latvia
Lithuania
Malta
Morocco
New Zealand
Oman
Pakistan
Panama
Philippines
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Romania
Serbia
Singapore
Slovenia
South Africa
South Korea
Sri Lanka
Taiwan
Thailand
Ukraine
United Arab Emirates
Uruguay