About Peter
Peter Nencini came to London in 1992, to study at the Royal College of Art. Aside from a three-year interlude working in Brussels, he stayed put. A designer and educator, he has worked across print and television for clients such as the New York Times and the BBC. More recently, he has gravitated towards editioned and exhibited work in ceramic, fabric, wood and metal — with a bonding interest in the space between typographic and figurative form. An interview about his work, with Ryan G. Nelson for the Walker Art Center, can be read here. His editioned box and wall works are currently showing at Partners & Spade, New York.
http://www.peternencini.co.uk
Current city: London
Peter Nencini came to London in 1992, to study at the Royal College of Art. Aside from a three-year interlude working in Brussels, he stayed put. A designer and educator, he has worked across print and television for clients such as the New York Times and the BBC. More recently, he has gravitated towards editioned and exhibited work in ceramic, fabric, wood and metal — with a bonding interest in the space between typographic and figurative form. An interview about his work, with Ryan G. Nelson for the Walker Art Center, can be read here. His editioned box and wall works are currently showing at Partners & Spade, New York.
 
The gallery was extended into a neighbouring Victorian House space about a year and a half ago, with a real skill in judging the meeting point between the contemporary and the conserved. The architects — 6a — were also responsible for Raven Row near Spitalfields (another favourite place). I'm lucky enough to work part of the week next door, at Camberwell College of Arts. This is about great food and good books. The café — a real haven at breakfast time before work — is run by the nicest team of people, with intertwined relationships to Camberwell. This book, designed by James Langdon, represents the kind of find possible in the bookshop and also the quality of conversation content had, over the best coffee.
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A treasure trove in the The City of London. The Archive of London. Strongrooms hold kilometres of shelving; boxes of matter that has somehow been catalogued and categorised in a traceable manner by the public, for academic, genealogical and other research. This beautiful book is from a box on Epping Forest. On the same visit, I looked through photographs of Blitz singsongs in Bethnal Green Underground station, 1980s anti-Thatcher / pro-GLC gig posters and paper concertina optical models of the Crystal Palace.
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The Lambeth Walk is not as billed in the song. Quite a bleak but somehow beautiful mishmash of architectural accident–or–design; a legacy of stray WWII bombs intended for more auspicious near-at-hand targets, such as the Houses of Parliament. I study sculpture here each Monday; a lovely workshop inside. The exterior features one of only a few examples of an outside pulpit, apparently for the minister to take his message direct to the shoppers, in the Walk's heyday.
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In terms of materials and form, these galleries offer so much. On an abstract and typographic level, so useful. This is a section of an altar frieze, from the Eye Temple at Tell Brak (N.E. Syria), dated 3300–3000BC. The Egyptian rooms take the tourist weight; these spaces are much quieter and amenable time spent drawing and thinking.
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I walk a lot; the best way to experience a city. So it's sometimes to do with the way places join up. This cast concrete letterform is a part of the Lycée's gateway. Each of the form's facets arrives at a different character, so six possible letters come from each cast object. I've never been inside the Lycée but always walked through this way up to the V&A, in order to examine again and again how each form works. The surfaces set the tone for the V&A and its incredible Ceramics floor, a perennial inspiration.
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Not long in the custody of the National Trust, designed by Philip Webb and commissioned by William Morris, in 1859. Tucked away in Beckenham. William and Jane Morris only lived here for five years; not a happy time of their marriage. But there is humility, authority and even bite, in the domestic scale. The rigorous, holistic design-hand at work belies any sense of souvenir shop Morris-lite. The vegetable garden in late Summer is the place to be.
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More People in London 221

Media Entrepreneur Constantin Bjerke is the Founder and CEO of Crane.tv a story-telling company, which in 2011 was named a "top ten European start-up to watch in 2011" by the Wall Street Journal. Crane.tv is re-inventing cultural publishing as the first online video magazine for contemporary culture, with content also syndicated to a wide array of sites including the Huffington Post, Wallpaper*, and the New York Times reaching an influential, world-wide audience.
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Freelance Illustrator currently based in South London.
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I am a creative director and music producer living in London. Under the name “Klint” I've written and produced music for films and trailers such as Guy Ritchie’s Snatch, The Devil Wears Prada, Seven Psychopaths and The Monuments Men. In 2004 I co-founded Specialten, a music and film dvd magazine and in 2009 File magazine, an online film, art and design publication. My latest project is citylikeyou.
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Joanne Hummel Newell (b 1982) studied at Kingston University London from 2001 - 2004 and at The Royal College of Art, London, from 2004 -2006. Joanne is Co Director of artist run organisation Foal Arts is currently represented by Folly and Muse Gallery, London/Munich and Newblood Art London. Recent selected exhibitions and short lists include WW Gallery collateral exhibition at the 53rd Venice Biennale, Jerwood Drawing Prize, RA Summer Exhibition, Royal Watercolour Society Contemporary Competition, Shoosmiths Art Prize, The Other Art Fair London and Art MUC Munich with Folly and muse Gallery. Press features include the UK Times and Observer Newspaper, Fresh Paint magazine selected by Andrew Salgado, After Nyne Magazine, women in art issue. Works are included in public and private collections in UK, USA, Hong Kong and Australia. Joanne has also received a number of Arts Council England Grants for the Arts Awards for temporary installations and projects.
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