About Dylan
Dylan Mulvaney is head of design at Gretel. His expertise lies in translating core values, strategy, and voice into striking visual executions for clients like Apple, Netflix, MoMA, and RISD.
http://www.dmulvaney.com
Current city: New York
Dylan Mulvaney is head of design at Gretel. His expertise lies in translating core values, strategy, and voice into striking visual executions for clients like Apple, Netflix, MoMA, and RISD.
 
The Arm is a letterpress print shop in Brooklyn, New York focused on printing with hand set wood type, metal type and hand carved blocks.
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A museum and sculpture garden in the Long Island City section of Queens, New York City, designed and created by the Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi.
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A not-for-profit community museum and civic organization located in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The museum traces the history of New York City's five boroughs with its exhibitions of cultural ephemera and relics.
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Brooklyn's only black-owned Jazz Club and musician-run nonprofit supporting the arts and community since 1981.
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The Performing Garage is an Off-Off-Broadway theater in SoHo, New York City. Established in 1968, it is the permanent home of the experimental theater company originally named The Performance Group that morphed in 1980 into The Wooster Group, and their primary performance venue.
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Spectacle is a collectively-run screening space in Brooklyn, NY, established and staffed by hard-working, cinema-loving volunteers. Our programming runs seven days a week and includes overlooked works, offbeat gems, contemporary art, radical polemics, live performance, and more.
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Bluestockings Cooperative is a community-supported bookstore and activist space.
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Explore NYC’s new and enduring architecture, engineering marvels and the revitalized waterfront from the teak decks of Classic Harbor Line’s elegant motor yachts.
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A masterpiece of LGBT art has been restored in what may now be the most valuable restroom in America.
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Leaf through over 30,000 artists' sketchbooks in what may be the world's largest collection.
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Empty, but not abandoned, this cavernous Brooklyn loading dock was once considered the largest individual building in the world.
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The Tenement Museum celebrates the enduring stories that define and strengthen what it means to be American. We share stories of the immigrant and migrant experience through guided tours of our two tenement buildings on Orchard Street and the surrounding neighborhood on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Visitors can take building tours of the recreated homes of our former residents between the 1860s and the 1980s as well as walking tours of the neighborhood they lived in.
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A beautiful and abandoned New York subway station from 1904, complete with chandelier. Take the 6 train heading downtown. When the train makes its final stop at the “Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall” station, passengers are told to exit the train. Stay on the train and duck down so as not to be easily spotted. When the train departs the station, it will pass through the abandoned City Hall Station.
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A living archive preserving history and promoting scholarship of grassroots urban space activism by researching and archiving efforts to create community spaces. They also exhibit materials that document these actions, to educate people on the political implications of reclaimed space.
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A New York garbage depot holds a secret collection of weird and wonderful refuse.
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Rising up 130 feet above sea level, this new park occupies some of the highest ground in New York City and offers spectacular panoramic views of the Empire State Building to the northwest, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and New York Harbor to the west, and Jamaica Bay to the south.
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Posted by Dylan Mulvaney
A non-collecting arts institution that fosters experimentation and dialogue through exhibitions, public programs, and artist residencies.
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This simple Manhattan salt house is shaped like a monumental grain of salt. The Shed is an effort by the city to make even their most utilitarian architecture into unique pieces of art.
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A community-engaged and accessible arts space dedicated to supporting artists in the production and presentation of public artworks. Socrates does not have a permanent collection and all artworks are temporarily on view.
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The Ford Foundation Atrium houses a miniature tropical rainforest. Its glass walls create a temperate environment for the garden, while also creating a seamless flow of green space between the atrium and Tudor City Park to the east. The Ford Foundation Gallery shines a light on artwork that wrestles with difficult questions, calls out injustice, and points the way toward a more fair and just future. The atrium is open to the public Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. when the gallery has an exhibition on view.
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An unchanged 1940s lounge known for its masterpiece Martinis and whimsical murals painted by the author of “Madeline,” Ludwig Bemelmans.
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Eero Saarinen’s landmark 1962 TWA Flight Center at JFK Airport restored and reimagined as a first-class hotel.
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A landmarked modernist interior designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson. The former Four Seasons restaurant has been reopened as The Grill. Make your way to The Bar situated at the top of the famous staircase, beneath Richard Lippold’s iconic ceiling sculpture. It is a destination in New York City's architecture and cocktail culture.
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In 1963, the Italian-born sculptor Costantino Nivola filled a playground that covers an entire city block with avant-garde abstractions. In the middle of an Upper Manhattan housing project, there are cuboid cutouts sculpted in cement, a fountain made with two diamond-shaped boulders, concrete play horses, and a sand-casted relief carved high into a wall. In the northeast corner, a matriarchal figure known as “The Nanny” rises from the ground. The artist’s sculptures were built in an era when urban development incorporated art in its effort to uplift communities and express democratic ideals. “A work designed for a public space is less a work of art than a civic act,” Nivola once said. “It concerns the ways in which we live together, and in which we influence each other.”
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We are an independent, non-profit, online radio station live streaming 24/7 from a reclaimed shipping container on an empty lot in NYC.
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A documentary cinema where filmmakers and film lovers can come together in appreciation of nonfiction film. Housed in DCTV's beloved landmarked building in Chinatown, New York City, Firehouse features first run, curated, repertory, masterclasses, family programs, and more.
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The Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park is a four-acre memorial to Franklin D. Roosevelt designed by Louis Kahn that celebrates the Four Freedoms Roosevelt articulated in his 1941 State of the Union address.
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The graphic designer Rudolph de Harak created a three-story digital clock installed on the exterior of 200 Water Street. The clock consists of 72 square modules with numerals that light according to date, hour, minute and second.
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The first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.
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Opened in 1985, The Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography was created in order to preserve an unprecedented resource, Herb Lubalin’s vast collection of work. Its goal was to provide the design community with a means to honor Lubalin, and to study his innovative work. The collection also includes work by other eminent designers including Otl Aicher, Rudi Baur, Anthon Beeke, Lucian Bernhard, Lester Beall, Will Burtin, Lou Dorfsman, Karl Gerstner, Tibor Kalman, Alvin Lustig, The Push Pin Studios, Paul Rand, Bradbury Thompson, Massimo Vignelli, and many more. There is also a library of books and magazines about design and typography, an extensive collection of posters, myriad type specimen books and pamphlets.
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Interference Archive is a volunteer-run library, gallery, and archive of historical materials related to social and political activism and movements.
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Founded by a small team of film enthusiasts, Brooklyn Film Camera is one of NYC’s premier destinations for analog photographers.
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A new artificial island park where all New Yorkers and visitors can experience nature and art in a unique urban oasis on the Hudson River. The park features a lush, seasonal, landscape with rolling hills, winding pathways and dazzling views coupled with programming that includes music, dance, theater, poetry, comedy and arts workshops for all ages.
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Secondhand works of fiction, film & philosophy sold in a shop with gatherings & special events.
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A modern natural history museum located in a freight elevator dedicated to its signature curatorial style of "Object Journalism" that draws parallels to the older cabinet of curiosities model.
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Stocks artists’ books and catalogs along with used and rare titles that focus on contemporary art, photography, and classical painting.
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An experiential event series dedicated to working with artists to bring new ecologies to architecturally unique spaces through transcendent audio and visual performance.
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The Theatre for a New Audience is a non-profit theater in New York City focused on producing Shakespeare and other classic dramas. Its off-Broadway productions have toured in the U.S. and internationally.
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The crown jewel of the Queens Museum is a nearly 10,000-square-foot architectural model of the city originally built for the 1964 World's Fair.
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Bill Brand presents an animated movie to passengers on the B and Q subway trains coming into Manhattan from Brooklyn. The project was modeled after the zoetrope, a 19th-century optical toy, which animated images inside a revolving cylinder, so that they appeared to move when viewed through narrow slits. Brand mounted 228 hand-painted panels in self-contained, illuminated units along the three-hundred-foot platform. Hop on a Manhattan-bound B or Q train at the Dekalb Avenue stop (corner of Dekalb Avenue and Flatbush Avenue Extension). Look out any window on the right side of the train.
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More People in New York 350

French photographer/director based in NYC
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“Today, luxury is not lived in the same way as before. Today, luxury is not perceived as it once was. Today we experience two luxuries that do not speak the same language and do not live within the same values."
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Mitzi Akaha is a New York-based actress with roots in the Midwestern US, Japan, and the central coast of California. After developing her career in Japan, she relocated to New York in 2014 where she continues to contribute her particular talents and peculiar humor to a variety of projects, starring in national commercial spots, music videos and films. She is also a published writer and illustrator and has multiple scripts in development.
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